Pinky Pinky

“Pinky Pinky is a way of giving narrative form to things that seem impossible to speak about directly. It’s a constructed entity onto which we can project psychic states of fear and moral panics in society at large, but more particularly in our post-apartheid moment of radical change…Pinky Pinky is a half-human, half-animal, bi-gendered creature of indeterminate race that terrorises prepubescent school kids when they go to the toilet…There is no fixed identity for Pinky, no stable reference. Its a processual thing, changing its form with every telling.” (Penny Siopis, 2014)

Pinky Pinky is an urban legend that seems to have emerged in 1994. A pink, hybrid creature that is half-human, half-animal, bi-gendered and of indeterminate race that terrorises prepubescent school kids when they go to the toilet. Siopis translated the various stories of the creature into paintings – plastic body parts and little objects emerging out of the thick and fleshy painted surfaces – fake scars, wounds, eyes, fingernails and teeth. Because the paint is thick and manipulated in different ways, light catches the forms in ambient ways – defining an image and accentuating the processual qualities of a spectral creature.  Allegorising the anxiety of a society in radical transition, engaging imagination and fantasy, Pinky Pinky expresses a kind of excited fright which can be cathartic.